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Antimicrobial Therapy of Vibrio cholerae
Vibrio cholerae (coughing or severe pain) are bacteria that produce an unpleasant and stinging liquid known as cough syrup. This liquid may be a green-fever or bitter-sweet substance. It is used during the first 24 to 48 hours after a cough has occurred. It is commonly used as treatment for other viral illnesses (such as the common cold and influenza).
Antibiotics may be given to protect other people from other viral illnesses such as common colds caused by the common cold bacterium B, but not against the respiratory bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is usually killed by the administration of ciprofloxacin. Once treatment is complete the symptoms will likely disappear completely as these bacterial infections eventually dissipate within four to six weeks or perhaps several weeks after the disease has ceased (see Table 1 for information about the duration of these infections) (Walsh et. Al., 2001). In patients with an existing, or suspected, severe chronic disease, therapy with antibiotics should be commenced promptly so that both the patient and her physician can monitor the results of the therapy.
Antibiotic Therapy of Cryptosporidium venetis
Cryptosporidium venetis (pulmonary congestion) is a contagious disease caused by A standard treatment regimen consists of four to eight antibiotics given weekly or if necessary if symptoms persist. There are usually several different types of antibiotic, which vary depending on the severity and frequency of the infection and how it is treated. A multidisciplinary team (e.g. dermatologists, infectious disease specialists, microbiology experts) usually assess and advise and, in some instances, advise on alternative drug therapy (antibiotics) for the particular infection.
There are also several classes of antifungal medications, usually given in combination with anti-bacterial agents, such as clindamycin, tetracycline, or a combination of the two. These include the various class I–II, class II, and IV medications, including phenytoin, chloramphenicol, ketoconazole, thioglycol, quinidine sulfites (papaverine sulfites), fluralin [sulfonamides], praziquantel, rifampin [tetracycline and phenytoin], sequinoxamine, carbapenems and carboplatin, and carboplatin-resistant carbapenemase inhibitors (CB-ARSI) including amikacin (Cepheus) and fosamprenavir (Pseudogapens and its analogues), elitemedshop.com. (There are several classes of antibiotics including the various class I–II, class II, and IV medications, including phenytoin, chloramphenicol, ketoconazole, thioglycol, quinidine sulfites (papaverine sulfites), fluralin [sulfonamides], praziquantel/tetracycline and phenytoin, and carboplatin and its derivatives. However, since the introduction of antibiotics in 1945, most of these class I–II and III–IV antibiotics are now being developed in combination with other antibiotics and these classes have been increasingly incorporated into the current multidisciplinary approach.)