We’re dedicating today, June 11, to flooding policymakers with our request that they allocate funding for key recommendations in the “Pain Management Best Practices” report–a roadmap for improving pain care nationwide.

At U.S. Pain Foundation, we believe this report has the power to revolutionize pain care in the United States. But nothing will change for pain warriors unless Congress hears from YOU. Taking action is fast, fun, and incredibly important to improving the lives of the 50 million Americans with chronic pain.

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Because Because of the delay in making a diagnosis, there is also a waiting period in between treatment and detection. Antibiotics often do not cause any adverse effects on humans.
Medications such as antibiotics also may cause some illnesses, such as depression, fatigue, pain, sinus infections and urinary tract infections. Some common side effects include flu-like illness, such as fever and upper respiratory tract infection. Most commonly, these include: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, urinary tract infection, severe headache, stomach pain, pain in the hands and ankles, and severe fatigue. Other common side effects include: skin rash or rash on hands, feet or scalp, rash on skin and mouth, flu-like illness in women.
There are no guidelines for diagnosing depression or fatigue, although there do exist lists of symptoms. Most clinicians do not feel comfortable prescribing such medications for people with depressive symptoms or any symptoms of anxiety. People diagnosed with depression will often complain of feelings of depression, irritability and irritability, big-pharmacy24.com. This is known as “anhedonia.” Anhedonia is associated with poor mood and a lack of interest in routine activities of daily living. This can result in problems in functioning in the workplace and in relationship with friends and family. This condition can be treated through therapy or medication.
Diagnosing depression generally refers to an assessment of certain symptoms of poor mood that indicate there may be a link between a person’s symptoms of depression and what has happened to them in the past. This is known as “psychodynamic diagnosis.” For example, people may think of a family member with a mood disorder, for example, having suicidal thoughts, and it is important to be aware of the impact this might have on your family.

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As part of its “Action Collaborative on Countering the U.S. Opioid Epidemic,” the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) recently hosted a listening session to better understand the experiences of people living with chronic, non-cancer pain, including their experiences interacting with and navigating the health system. NAM also is seeking patients to share their experiences online via this survey.

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The final online event in our Pain Awareness Month series will explore the ways in which patient advocacy–at both the state and federal levels–centers on sharing your personal pain story. The event will take place Wednesday, Sept. 25, from 11:30 AM – 12:30 pm EST.

U.S. Pain Interim CEO Nicole Hemmenway will moderate a panel discussion with Cindy Steinberg, U.S. Pain National Director of Policy and Advocacy, Shaina Smith, U.S. Pain Director of State Advocacy and Alliance Development, and special guest Rhode Island State Rep. Patricia Serpa.

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Don’t be shy.

As part of our Pain Awareness Month Storyathon, we’re collecting 3-5 minute video stories from real people with pain, talking about their personal experiences–from how they were diagnosed to how pain affects their daily life. We’ll be selecting a handful of videos to share throughout September on social media.

Remember: talking about pain is the only way we can create understanding, awareness, and most importantly: change.

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In late December, a high-ranking federal task force released a draft report with recommendations for improving the management of chronic and acute pain nationwide. The landmark report will be finalized and submitted to Congress at the end of May. The pain community is being asked to give feedback on the report by April 1–less than a month away.

“It is vital that people with pain weigh in,” says Cindy Steinberg, National Director of Policy and Advocacy, who was the only patient and patient advocacy representative on the task force. “This report could change people with pain’s lives for the better. It promotes a multidisciplinary, multimodal approach to pain care and addresses barriers to accessing effective treatment. It says that treatment decisions should be made on a case-by-case basis that considers the unique situation of each patient. It addresses the stigma around chronic pain and lack of public, provider and patient education on pain management. It provides a comprehensive view of the gaps in pain care in the United States today and detailed recommendations on how to ameliorate them.”

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U.S. Pain’s Director of State Advocacy and Alliance Development Shaina Smith was among the speakers at the Biotechnology Innovation Organization’s (BIO) Patient and Health Advocacy Summit held Oct. 25 and 26 in Washington, D.C. The annual event brings together patient advocacy organizations, academia, regulators, biotechnology industry, and other stakeholders to discuss timely policy issues and share best practices. This year, attendees were treated to a surprise appearance from U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar.

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Volunteers who have signed up to join the Advocacy Network joined an invitation-only training webinar to learn about an issue impacting families and individuals across the country: surprise bills.

The presentation was the first of a series of advocacy training webinars scheduled for the upcoming year, according to Director of State Advocacy and Alliance Development, Shaina Smith. “We’re really trying to develop and offer resources that will improve the lives of people with chronic illness through education,” Smith explains. “The more we learn as a community, the greater chance we will have at successfully moving patient-friendly policies forward.”

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Policymakers across both aisles have had mixed viewpoints when it comes to cultivating cannabis, not in the literal sense, but as it relates to bills that would permit individuals to access medical cannabis. Several states, however, are expanding or considering expanding their medical cannabis programs, including Illinois, New York, and New Jersey. In addition, some federal institutions have taken steps to improve access: the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and Congress.

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