Mind you

By: Mia Maysack

I have never said that mindfulness fixes or cures, that it is easy, looks the same for everyone, or that it should even be referred to by that term.

It would be incorrect of me to make the claim that anything erases discomfort and all symptoms attached to them. Yet instead of exploring this concept for themselves, many want to attack it or remain defensive without genuinely committing, as if tension assists them in feeling better than letting it go would.

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Mindfull

By: Mia Maysack

How are we able to go about pursuing or even simply believing in the concept of wellness, while attempting to cope with the opposite of being well?

At a physical therapy appointment a few years back, I met with a provider who used to experience debilitating pain himself after an accident. He’d since become pain-free and had a certain arrogance, as if he’d cracked the code, so I looked forward to working together.

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By Mia Maysack

A loved one recently used the word “suffering” while expressing their thoughts on my situation.  Yes, it does feel like agony at times, but I no longer embrace that word as a part of my personal terminology, therefore, I affirm that by making it known to others.

How can anyone know what our wants/needs are unless we convey them?

Furthermore, how do we go about conveying something we ourselves might not even know??

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July’s mindfulness meditation webinar began with a quote from a Buddhist monk: “When we get too caught up in the busyness of the world, we lose connection with one another–and ourselves.” Webinar host Gwenn Herman, LCSW, DCSW, Clinical Director of Pain Connection and a person who has lived with pain for 20+ years, believes strongly in the efficacy of mindfulness. In “From ow to om: Using mindfulness to reduce pain and stress,” she taught mindfulness meditation to webinar participants hoping to use it as a tool in their treatment plan.

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The U.S. Pain Foundation is excited to present the next event in its bimonthly webinar series, “From ow to om: Using mindfulness to reduce pain and stress,” featuring Gwenn Herman, LCSW, DCSW. Herman is the clinical director for U.S. Pain’s Pain Connection program, a network of support groups and other resources for people with pain.

During July’s webinar, to be held on the 17 from 1 to 2 pm EST, Herman will focus on using meditation and mindfulness to lower pain and stress levels. She will discuss the science behind mindfulness, different techniques, and lead attendees in a guided meditation. There is a great deal of scientific data to support the positive effects of mindfulness meditation for people suffering from chronic pain, and this free webinar is a rare opportunity to learn from someone who intimately understands these health issues.

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